TCAD Former Projects

  1. Composite CAD for MEMS

    The field of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems) is diverse in both applications domains and CAD tools required for analysis. This project cross-cuts other groups at Stanford in materials science (Bravman) and MEMS applications (Kovacs) along with the core CAD activities in the Dutton group. The focus of the project is to develop tools and methodology that capture fabrication details that directly affect behavior at the subsytems level. Current tools activities include: geometry modeling, process modeling (emphasis on materials and stress effects), gridding in support of FEM analysis and multi-physics behavior modeling (emphasis on coupled electrical and mechanical dynamic simulation).

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  2. Behavior Analysis of RF Devices

    The modeling of RF devices and circuits require characterization of frequency behavior that depends critically on device non-linearities, for example harmonic (HD) and intermodulation (IM) distortion. This project uses a new device level harmonic balance (HB) analysis technique to characterize and model behavior of several RF power devices (i.e. BJT, LDMOS, GaAs MESFET ...). Results have demonstrated capabilites to extract critical design parameters and to correlate them with key technology, layout and packaging parameters. Another project in the RF area is simulation and modeling of amplifier front end noise and its correlation with hot carrier effects.

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  3. Shared Computational Prototyping Environment (ParaSCOPE)

    The prototyping of IC technology and especially for problems with complex physics, advanced processing and large 3D problems, requires new tools and numerical methods---both computationally and for visualization of complex results. This project brings together a heterogenous set of TCAD tools (ALAMODE and PROPHET) within the context of shared parallel computational resources (i.e. the "para" in ParaSCOPE) and in support of internet use and visualization. Advances in rapid prototyping of new physical models, applications to leading edge IC technology development (and characterization) as well as a range of supporting software issues are being pursued.

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  4. Advanced Process Simulation using A Layered Model Development Environment ( ALAMODE), PROPHET (Bell Labs) and other FEM-based tools

    There are a range of new and advanced physical models needed for deep submicron IC technology. This project, a companion to the ParaSCOPE (which is more system level and application driven), addresses the details of tool developments that are needed for such advanced physical modeling. Three distinct classes of tools are being developed, compared and made to be inter-operable (when possible and useful). ALAMODE uses a deeply object-oriented implementation of a PDE "engine" with emphasis on reactive-diffusive equations. The PROPHET tool, being collaboratively developed with Bell Labs, is targeted as a combined process/device simulator with modular "scripting" of new models at an operator level. Other work in FEM-based stress anaylsis uses an Eularian formulation that comes from the computational mechanics community.

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  5. Device Modeling of Electrostatic Discharge (ESD)

    There are increasing demands on devices and circuits at the periphery of ICs due to reliabilty issues such as latchup, substrate noise and electrostatic discharge (ESD). All of these problems require modeling of distributed effects inside the substrate and careful consideration of the boundary conditions and lumped circuit elements that represent both the circuit schematics as well as parasitic effect. This project seeks to apply advanced 2D and 3D device modeling, including mixed-level circuit/device as well as electrical/thermal simulations, to characterize ESD and support innovations that help prevent it. This project is partially supported by SRC and cross-cuts Mechanical Engineering (Goodson) and Electrical Engineering (Dutton).

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  6. Stress Analysis of Shallow Trench Isolation (STI)

    There is a rapid shift in isolation technology for ICs from the traditional LOCOS process to STI in order to increase packing density for deep submicron processes. However, there are many challenges related to stress, materials/process dependences and electrical behavior (especially leakage). This project is targeted to develop and apply new FEM-based software (see ParaSCOPE and ALAMODE project descriptions) specifically to the area of stress analysis for STI. The project is partially supported by SRC (experimental only) with major software efforts supported through DARPA and CIS sponsor funding. The goal is to demonstrate new computational models for stress and to quantify the materials dependences and applications in practical technology demonstrations.

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